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Part 2: Caring for Your Parent or Loved One Without Being in the Caregiver Role

Caring for your parent or loved one without becoming the caregiver.

In the first article of this blog post series, we shared information about making the difficult decision to choose a caregiver agency for a loved one. Now, in part 2 of this series, we are taking a closer look at how you can be an advocate for your loved ones, connect with their caregivers, and ensure quality services going forward.

With the right approach, you can be a proactive participant in your aging family member’s life while also avoiding the burnout that often happens when being a full-time caregiver for a loved one. Caregiver duties and responsibilities are heavy to bear alone, which is why it’s critical to hire support for medical and home care services.

Here are a few essential details to consider so you can keep your promise for love by supporting an aging loved one without being in the full-time caregiving role:

Caregiver Connect: Being an Advocate for Your Loved One

Aging adults need people to advocate for their well-being, which is why it’s essential for family members to continue their involvement even after hiring a caregiver for elderly. Most of the main caregiver responsibilities will be handled through a community provider or in-home care, such as personal hygiene, meal planning, and home health services. Even though you aren’t a full-time caregiver to parent or other family member, you can be an advocate by maintaining communication with the providers to oversee all caregiver duties and responsibilities.

Make sure the provider has a caregiver license and caregiver training. Ask questions about daily activities, medical treatments, caregiver training, and other details that impact the level of care that your loved one is receiving.

How to Connect with Caregivers and Set Expectations

Not only is it important to ask the right questions, but also to be proactive about connecting with the caregivers on a personal level. These providers spend a lot of time with your loved one, which is why it makes sense for the family to build a relationship with each provider. Ask how they are doing, learn about their hobbies and interests, and make sure to reach out on holidays.

Building these relationships makes it easier to have tough conversations when necessary. In addition, the care provider will be more open to feedback when a strong foundation of friendship is already in place.

Also, consider the expectations you are setting for schedules and provided services. Two-way communication is essential to ensure continuity of care.

Caregiver Training: Keeping Your Loved One Involved In Decision Making

Proactively keeping the family member or parent involved in decisions helps them feel confident and comfortable with the services they are receiving. Giving up independence is a difficult transition in life, which is why some people are resistant to hiring a caregiver agency. But there are many ways the aging family member or parent can be part of the process when designing social activities, in-home services, daily routines, and more.

Evaluate the person’s mental and physical capabilities, then talk to the caregiver about how your loved one can be more involved in the conversation. Ideally, your loved one should maintain independence in the things they are able to do by themselves, with assistance in the areas where they need additional support.

For example, the person might not have the physical ability to go grocery shopping or stand over the stove to prepare dinner. But they can be part of the conversation when coordinating the meal schedule for the week. Ask for feedback about their favorite meals and snacks to include in the meal plan.

Handling Finances to Pay for a Caregiver Agency

One common concern when shifting from being a caregiver to family member to bringing in help from a caregiver agency is how to pay for these services. Most people assume that they need to continue bearing full-time caregiver requirements because they can’t afford part-time or full-time caregiving services. The truth is that many aging adults qualify for financial support through private insurance or Medicare. When the caregiver qualifications are met, an individual can receive the financial support to cover everything from in-home care to full-time living in a caregiving community.

Caregiver Qualities and Services You Can Trust

Hiring the right caregiver agency is one of the best decisions you can make to ensure the quality of care for your loved one. Our team offers top-notch solutions for your loved one, with a variety of services available at our Cadence Living communities.

We are here to support the care of your aging parents and close family members too. Learn about available services including assisted living, independent living, Cadence CONNECTIONS care, memory care, as well as social and physical wellness activities. Our full-service approach includes activities to meet your physical and social wellness needs. Give us a call to talk to a caregiving expert and schedule a tour in one of our modern aging communities!

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